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Your privacy is a primary concern to us at Ralph Maya & Company, CPAs. Our goal in expanding and clarifying our policy on the collection and use of client data is to ensure the highest level of confidentiality and security. This policy is a company-wide policy, not limited to our website. When you provide your personal information to Ralph Maya & Company, CPAs (such as your name, address, phone number, company name, or Federal Identification Number), we will not give or sell your individual information to any outside company for its use in marketing or solicitation without your consent. We will maintain the confidentiality of your personal information and it will be used only to support your client relationship with Ralph Maya & Company, CPAs. Additionally, internal practices help protect your privacy by limiting employee access to and use of customer data. When we ask for client information, we achieve our goal of improving the relationship with our clients. At Ralph Maya & Company, CPAs, we are helping you maintain control over your personal data while fostering the growth of a more interactive online environment. Our intention is to send e-mails only to clients or to individuals you, as clients, have chosen to receive such emails. At any time, you have the right to "opt out" of receiving future Ralph Maya & Company, CPAs' communications.


Charles P. "Chuck" Rettig was confirmed as the new IRS Commissioner on September 12. The Senate confirmed the nomination by a 64-to-33 vote. Rettig received both Democratic and Republican support.


New IRS guidance aiming to curb certain state and local tax (SALT) deduction cap "workarounds" is the latest "hot topic" tax debate on Capitol Hill. The IRS released proposed amendments to regulations, REG-112176-18, on August 23. The proposed rules would prevent taxpayers, effective August 27, 2018, from using certain charitable contributions to work around the new cap on SALT deductions.


The IRS has proposed to remove the Code Sec. 385 documentation regulations provided in Reg. §1.385-2. Although the proposed removal of the documentation rules will apply as of the date the proposed regulations are published as final in the Federal Register, taxpayers can rely on the proposed regulations until the final regulations are published.


Last year’s Tax Reform created a new 20-percent deduction of qualified business income for passthrough entities, subject to certain limitations. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) ( P.L. 115-97) created the new Code Sec. 199A passthrough deduction for noncorporate taxpayers, effective for tax years beginning after December 31, 2017. However, the provision was enacted only temporarily through 2025. The controversial deduction has remained a buzzing topic of debate among lawmakers, tax policy experts, and stakeholders. In addition to its impermanence, the new passthrough deduction’s ambiguous statutory language has created many questions for taxpayers and practitioners.


Wolters Kluwer recently spoke with Joshua Wu, member, Clark Hill PLC, about the tax implications of the new Code Sec. 199A passthrough deduction and its recently-released proposed regulations, REG-107892-18. That exchange included a discussion of the impact that the new law and IRS guidance, both present and future, may have on taxpayers and tax practitioners.


Wolters Kluwer has projected annual inflation-adjusted amounts for tax year 2019. The projected amounts include 2019 tax brackets, the standard deduction, and alternative minimum tax amounts, among others. The projected amounts are based on Consumer Price Index figures released by the U.S. Department of Labor on September 12, 2018.


No, taxpayers may destroy the original hardcopy of books and records and the original computerized records detailing the expenses of a business if they use an electronic storage system.