Newsletters
Tax Alerts
Tax Briefing(s)
Your privacy is a primary concern to us at Ralph Maya & Company, CPAs. Our goal in expanding and clarifying our policy on the collection and use of client data is to ensure the highest level of confidentiality and security. This policy is a company-wide policy, not limited to our website. When you provide your personal information to Ralph Maya & Company, CPAs (such as your name, address, phone number, company name, or Federal Identification Number), we will not give or sell your individual information to any outside company for its use in marketing or solicitation without your consent. We will maintain the confidentiality of your personal information and it will be used only to support your client relationship with Ralph Maya & Company, CPAs. Additionally, internal practices help protect your privacy by limiting employee access to and use of customer data. When we ask for client information, we achieve our goal of improving the relationship with our clients. At Ralph Maya & Company, CPAs, we are helping you maintain control over your personal data while fostering the growth of a more interactive online environment. Our intention is to send e-mails only to clients or to individuals you, as clients, have chosen to receive such emails. At any time, you have the right to "opt out" of receiving future Ralph Maya & Company, CPAs' communications.

New IRS guidance fills in several more pieces of the Code Sec. 199A passthrough deduction puzzle. Taxpayers can generally rely on all of these new final and proposed rules.


The IRS has issued interim guidance on the excise tax payable by exempt organizations on remuneration in excess of $1 million and any excess parachute payments made to certain highly compensated current and former employees in the tax year. The excise tax imposed by Code Sec. 4960 is equal to the maximum corporate tax rate on income (currently 21 percent).


The IRS has provided safe harbors for business entities to deduct certain payments made to a charitable organization in exchange for a state or local tax (SALT) credit. A business entity may deduct the payments as an ordinary and necessary business expenses under Code Sec. 162 if made for a business purpose. Proposed regulations that limit the charitable contribution deduction do not affect the deduction as a business expense.


The Treasury and IRS have issued final regulations for determining the inclusion under Code Sec. 965 of a U.S. shareholder of a foreign corporation with post-1986 accumulated deferred foreign income. Code Sec. 965 imposes a "transition tax" on the inclusion. The final regulations retain the basic approach and structure of the proposed regulations, with certain changes.


The IRS has issued its annual revisions to the general procedures for ruling requests, technical memoranda, determination letters, and user fees, as well as areas on which the Associate Chief Counsel offices will not rule. The revised procedures are generally effective January 2, 2019.


No, taxpayers may destroy the original hardcopy of books and records and the original computerized records detailing the expenses of a business if they use an electronic storage system.